Lightroom Killer Tips Lightroom Presets, Videos, Tips and News 2014-12-20T17:36:56Z http://lightroomkillertips.com/feed/atom/ Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Simple, Yet Smart ‘Color Labels’ Idea From One of My Readers]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6481 2014-12-20T00:22:06Z 2014-12-20T00:20:40Z After taking my survey yesterday, Andy Ramsay, posted a […]

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Traffic lights

After taking my survey yesterday, Andy Ramsay, posted a comment with the very simple, clever, and effective way he uses Color Labels in Lightroom. Here’s what he wrote:

“I use traffic-light-style colour labels to identify ‘Needs Work in Photoshop’ [Red], ‘Been worked in Photoshop, Needs final LR adjustments’ [Amber], and ‘Ready for Release’ [Green]. …My portfolio smart collection is built to only use photos that are coloured Green and tagged ‘portfolio’.”

This is the type of stuff we all tend to over-think. Love the simplicity. Thanks for sharing that, Andy (and I thought some of you might find it useful). :)

Best,

-Scott

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Results from Yesterday’s Lightroom “Tagging” Survey]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6475 2014-12-20T17:36:56Z 2014-12-19T16:51:56Z Here's the surprising results (well, one result was surprising) from yesterday's "Which of these three ways do you tag your Lightroom images" survey.

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Thanks to 1,800+ of you who were kind enough to take the survey yesterday (much appreciated).

I was surprised to see…
…that nearly 40% of the respondents use Color Labels as part of their workflow, especially since Lightroom Mobile doesn’t yet support Color Labels (a feature that’s been in the desktop version of Lightroom since 1.0). It supports Pick Flags and Star Ratings, but not Color Labels. Maybe if the LR team at Adobe sees that enough people use Color Labels they’ll add it to a future Lightroom Mobile update.

So, thanks again to all of you who participated. :)

 

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Follow Up: Insetting One Photo On Top of Another In Lightroom]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6459 2014-12-18T16:30:52Z 2014-12-18T15:57:37Z This is quick follow-up to Monday's post where I show how to create the optional "Photo inset" that I mentioned in that post. It's really quick and easy (hope you give it a try).

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Hi Gang: This is just a quick follow-up to my post earlier this week on Back-screening an image. At the end, I showed an example with an inset photo overlapping a full bleed photo and I offered to show how it’s done (because it’s not super obvious. Well, it wasn’t to me the first time I tried it anyway). A few folks asked me to show it, so here’s one way to get it done:

back1

STEP ONE:

While you can do this from scratch using the “Custom Package” Layout Style (in the Layout Styles panel) and then use the Cells panel to create it, I think it’s quicker to start with one of Adobe’s built-in templates — it just saves you a few steps — so start by clicking on the Template “Custom Overlap x 3 Landscape as shown here to bring up the template.

back2

STEP TWO:

We want a full bleed back-screened photo behind our inset, but by default there’s a margin all the way around the letter sized template, so click the Page Set-up button at the bottom of the left side panels, and choose “Manage Custom Sizes” from the pop-up menu and when the dialog you see above appears, set your borders to 0 inches on all sides, then click OK.

back3

STEP THREE:

Drag your back-screened image into the large 8×10 cell that’s already there (as seen here). We only need two cells (not four), so click on the other two cells (one at a time) and hit the Delete key (PC: Backspace) to remove them from our layout, so you’re left what just what you see here — two cells, with one smaller one overlapping the background image.

back4

 

STEP FOUR:

Grab the edges of your background image and just drag each to the edges of the paper to create a full-bleed image (with no white border, like you see here). Then right-click on the smaller cell in front and choose “Rotate Cell” from the pop-up menu appears so we can flip this cell so it’s tall rather than wide.

back5

STEP FIVE:

Now drag the image you want as your inset from the Filmstrip up into this tall cell (in this case, it’s the bride peeking out the front doors of the church) and click and drag it wherever you’d like. Lastly, add your custom Identity Plate text like I showed in Monday’s post.

That’s it. Pretty quick and easy. :)

UPDATE: One of my awesome readers, Paul C (from the UK) just commented not to forget to save this is a template, so you only have to do this, this one time. Thanks Paul! :)

Hope you have a fantastic Thursday and I hope to see ya back here tomorrow.

Best,

-Scott

 

 

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Will You Take a Quick One-Question Lightroom Survey?]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6468 2014-12-18T16:28:22Z 2014-12-18T14:12:48Z Would you mind taking this super-quick, one question survey about how you tag your images in your Lightroom workflow? Should only take about 15-seconds, tops.

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My buddy Terry White (from Adobe Systems) posted a survey yesterday on the use of different ways to tag your images in Lightroom (Pick Flags, Star Ratings and Color Labels), and I wanted to do the same thing here today with my audience (don’t go look at Terry’s — I don’t want it to taint your answers).

So, if you wouldn’t mind, can you just take this quick one-question survey and let me know which of these three methods you use (you can choose all of them, or just one or two — choose as many as you use in your own workflow). I’ll post the results shortly.

Many thanks in advance – here’s the survey link: https://scottkelby.typeform.com/to/mFDiNP

Best,

-Scott

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Follow-up to Yesterday’s Lightroom Mobile Post From Lightroom Guru Rob Sylvan]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6448 2014-12-17T20:40:18Z 2014-12-17T17:32:08Z Great follow-up to my post yesterday — Rob talks about moving Raw files over to Lightroom Mobile.

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[Hi Gang: Yesterday when I did my Lightroom Mobile post, Rob was kind enough to drop in with answers to some questions folks had about how Lightroom Mobile handles the transfer of files, in particular Raw files, and his answers were so helpful that I invited him to dig in a little deeper today with a follow-up post of his own. Many thanks to Rob for taking the time, and for being such an awesome part of the overall Lightroom community. -Scott]

Greetings! Scott was kind enough to offer me the opportunity to do a follow up to his post from yesterday where he demonstrated his [link=  for using Lightroom Mobile in the Studio[link]. This follow up post stemmed from a question I answered on his Faceboook page[link] that related to what types of image files can work with Lightroom Mobile, and how big are the pixel dimensions of those images sent to the iPad/iPhone. These are similar to the types of Lightroom Mobile questions I get on the KelbyOne Lightroom Help Desk, so here I am.

Let’s back up a step and clarify some terminology before we go further. Lightroom Mobile was released at the same time as the Lightroom 5.4 update was released. As a result you will hear the regular version of Lightroom that runs on your computer referred to as Lightroom Destktop (LR Desktop), and the mobile app you can use on your iPhone/iPad (Android development is in the works) is referred to as Lightroom Mobile (LR Mobile).

Figure1

On LR Desktop you can import supported raw files, DNG, JPG, TIF, PSD, PNG, and supported video formats. This is true whether you have purchased a perpetual (non-Creative Cloud) license for Lightroom or if you are a Creative Cloud subscriber. Lightroom 5 is Lightroom 5 no matter how you pay for the license. There’s nothing new in this regard. The difference is that Creative Cloud subscribers also have access to using the new Lightroom Mobile app. Scott demonstrated one way Lightroom Mobile can be used, but it can also be used for simple tasks such as keeping a collection (or multiple collections) of photos synchronized and accessible between your LR Desktop catalog and your iPhone/iPad for your own personal use. LR Mobile workflows will continue to evolve as this platform matures.

The reason LR Mobile is only available for Creative Cloud subscribers is that the cloud is needed to act as the bridge between LR Desktop and the LR Mobile app. There is no way to directly connect LR Desktop to the mobile app. It all goes through the cloud subscription using your Adobe ID.

Note, if you currently have a perpetual license for Lightroom 5 you can try the [link] 30-day trial for Lightroom Mobile[/link].

OK, now when using the LR Mobile app you can import JPG and PNG files stored on your mobile device into the app and have those JPG and PNG files automatically synchronized and added back to your Lightroom Desktop catalog. In this instance the full size version of those images are downloaded to your computer as part of the process. This is very handy, and it has become the number one way I get my iPhone photos stored back on my computer.

Figure2

That said let me try to clarify two common points of confusion, it is not possible to tether your camera to your iPad using LR Mobile (you can only tether using LR Desktop), and it is not possible to copy raw photos from your camera onto your iPad and import raw photos directly into LR Mobile (you have to import the raw photos into LR Desktop first). Could those things be added in the future? I have no idea, but for now some things just have to be done on LR Desktop.

So in Scott’s demonstration he was shooting tethered to his laptop using LR Desktop to control the camera and copy the photos to his computer. His camera was set to shoot in raw format. He then created a collection, set that collection as the Target Collection (so he could use the B key shortcut to add specific photos to that collection), and configured that collection to sync with LR Mobile. As he added photos to the collection using the B key those photos were then automatically synched to LR Mobile.

Keep in mind that the original source image is not being uploaded to the cloud. Instead LR Desktop checks to see if Smart Previews (a special type of DNG file limited to 2560 pixels on the long side) exist for those photos, and if not it creates Smart Previews on the fly, and it is the Smart Preview version that is uploaded to the cloud. In addition, two smaller rendered previews, the photo’s metadata, and any Develop settings are also uploaded to the cloud. Smart Previews give us all the editability (not really a word, but should be) of the original raw file, but with a significantly smaller file size, which is essential to the uploading of data to and from the cloud.

Figure3a

Under normal LR Mobile operation we are only seeing the smaller rendered previews as thumbnails on our mobile devices. If you tap into a larger view then the Smart Preview version is downloaded to your device so that you can take advantage of LR Mobile’s editing tools (your device obviously needs to be connected to the Internet for this to work). LR Mobile does a good job of managing disk space on your mobile device, so those Smart Previews are not stored there forever. Note, it is possible to enable offline editing of selected photos, which stores the Smart Preview on the mobile device while you are offline for times when you need them and are out of Internet range.

Figure4

There’s clearly a lot more to be said about LR Mobile, but I hope that filled in the gaps from the original question that spawned this follow up post. I hope that helps!

rob_sylvan

Sylvan [link] is a photographer, educator, and aspiring beekeeper. He is the author of many photography related print books and eBooks, and answers all of the Lightroom questions on the KelbyOne Help Desk. You can read more of Rob’s Lightroom articles on [link].

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[My Workflow For Using Lightroom Mobile In The Studio]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6439 2014-12-17T20:42:05Z 2014-12-16T16:03:20Z It's a short tutorial on how to set up Lightoom so it not only send your images to Lightroom Mobile, but also to the Web so anyone, anywhere can proof live right along with you, as if they were there on the shoot.

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Morning everybody (and sorry for the late post. I had some technical issues this morning). Anyway, here’s a short video from a live shoot on how I use Lightroom Mobile in my workflow, and in particular (during this live shoot), I show how to set up Lightroom Mobile to not only get the images from your live shoot direct to an iPad (so a client, art director or assistant in the studio can see your best shots as they come in), but I also show how to set it up to where anyone anywhere can follow your shoot live as it happens. It’s really a pretty cool little set-up.

Right after I shot this video, Adobe released Lightroom version 5.7 and added the ability for someone reviewing the shoot remotely (from any Web browser) can not only tell you (via Lightroom) which shots are their favorites, but they can send comments directly to you via Lightroom about any particular image. I’ll have more on that soon, but in the meantime, here’s how I use Lightroom Mobile in my own workflow (I added my own twist to the default set-up that makes it work better for me, and you might want to consider this, too!).

Hope you find this helpful. :)

Best,

-Scott

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Adobe Releases Update to Lightroom (mostly new lens profiles)]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6442 2014-12-16T17:34:37Z 2014-12-16T13:04:34Z Adobe has released Lightroom Version 5.7.1 which includ […]

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lr571

Adobe has released Lightroom Version 5.7.1 which includes mostly new lens profiles, and support for the new Sony A7 Mark II, plus a minor bug fix. You can download the update here:

Mac: (download link)
PC: (download link)

Best,

-Scott

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Creating Back-screened Images in Lightroom]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6427 2014-12-15T03:46:48Z 2014-12-15T08:01:14Z Back-screening is a popular method of taking a full col […]

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Back-screening is a popular method of taking a full color image and lightening it so dramatically that you can easily put text over it and have it be clearly readable, or add another smaller inset photo on top of it and have it stand out, etc.. You’ll see this used a lot for the title slide of a slideshow or maybe in a wedding book, or just for an effect.

You start in the Develop module but finish in the Print Module where you can save your image as a JPEG and then reimport it and use it anywhere (from a photo book to a print to a slideshow — all in Lightroom). Here’s how:

Backscreen 1

STEP ONE:

Here’s the original image open in Lightroom. Now, in the Develop Module, go the Tone Curve panel (as seen here).

Backscreen 2

STEP TWO:

Grab the bottom left corner point of the Curve (well, of the diagonal straight line), and drag straight upward (as seen here). The higher you drag, the more pronounced the back-screened effect will be.

Backscreen 3

STEP THREE:

Now bounce over to the Print Module; scroll down to the Page module and turn on the Checkbox for Identity Plate. Now click and hold on the bottom right corner of the Identity Plate preview (in the Page module) and from the pop-up menu choose Edit to bring up the Identity Plate Editor you see above. Now, enter your text (I used Bickham Script Pro which comes with Photoshop, so if you have Photoshop installed, you should have this font. If you don’t, just choose a nice script font. I also used all-lowercase just for looks.

Backscreen 4a

STEP FOUR: 

When you click the “OK” button in the Identity Plate Editor it adds your text (though it will be centered, so in this case I just clicked and dragged it up into the empty space at the top to complete the effect.). Now you can save it as a JPEG in the Print Job folder; reimport that new JPEG image (it will have the back screen effect and the type just like you see above), and use that anywhere you like within Lightroom (or anywhere else for that matter).

Pretty darn simple, eh? I love when they’re simple. :)


 

HERE’S A OPTIONAL VARIATION:

Backscreen 5

ABOVE: You can also use this back-screen technique if you want to inset a photo on top of another photo (as seen above) using the Print Module’s Custom Custom Package feature. If you all want me to do a quick tutorial on how to do this variation, let me know and I’ll put one together for ya. (By the way: I changed the font here to P22-Cezanne).

Hope that starts your Monday off with something useful.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you’re not a part of KelbyOne yet, if you get a sec head over to KelbyOne.com this week because every day we’re running specials for the holidays, so if you ever wanted a subscription (or wanted to gift a subscription to someone), they have some really sweet deals. 

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Awesome Lightroom Tip For Sports Photographers (who use Macs)]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6417 2014-12-12T04:23:06Z 2014-12-12T08:01:38Z This is a workaround for getting a widely used (and beloved) feature in Photo Mechanic into your Lightroom-only sports photography workflow. We call it "The Sneaky Pete Play" — if you use Lightroom on a Mac, you'll dig it.

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My workflow for sports photography uses the same two programs that I see most of the other guys working pro games use: Photo Mechanic and Lightroom (or Photoshop). I could do an entire post on why Photo Mechanic is so awesome, but for today’s tip, I just want to focus on one of it’s features and how to use a workaround to get something similar into your Lightroom-Only workflow (for Mac users only — more on why in a moment).

First, the Photo Mechanic Feature

When you’re covering a pro-game, getting your images up to the wire quickly is absolutely imperative, and so many shooters (myself included) quickly look at the image from each play and tag our keepers right then in-camera while we’re still out on the field. We do this by pressing the “lock” button our camera, which is designed to keep that image from being accidentally erased, but Photo Mechanic recognizes that locked image as a “tagged image.” Because of that, when you download your memory card into your computer at halftime, you can ask Photo Mechanic to only show you your tagged images. That’s incredibly helpful because instead of wading through 1,000 or 2,000+ images trying to find the good shots up upload to the wire, PM shows you just the ones you’ve already tagged when you were out on the field, so you’re WAY ahead of the game. Sadly, Lightroom does not (though I’ve been talking directly with Adobe these past couple of day to see if this can be added in a future update, but for now, it’s can’t).

Now, the workaround

So far, we’ve only figured out how to do this on a Mac — we couldn’t figure out how to pull this off on a Windows machine yet, but if somebody knows, we’d love it if you’d post it here in the comment. Now, before I get into the tip — I’m aware there are plug-ins and scripts you can add to Lightroom that will do this, probably more elegantly than what I’m going to show you here today, but this is at least one way to “get there” without add-ons.

We call it “The Sneaky Pete Play” (because my buddy Pete Collins figured out most of this workaround)

Now, before I lay this out, there is one part where you’re going to want to freak out, but don’t — your images aren’t in any danger because you still have an entire full backup. Just so you know that’s coming. OK, take a deep breath: here we go (remember, this is a workaround, and a tiny bit clunky at that, but it will still achieve pretty much the same thing — you getting to work on your tagged images without looking through thousands of images to find the keepers).

peteplay1

STEP ONE:
Don’t import the photos on your memory card  into Lightoom. Instead, just drag the folder of images directly onto your hard drive (or external drive) so it copies them there. If you look in the folder above, you can see a couple of the locked files (a small lock icon appears in the bottom left corner of the thumbnail. See files 150 and 152 above). Just to reiterate — I copied this files onto my computer from the memory card.

peteplay2

STEP TWO:
Click on any one of those thumbnail on your computer and press Command-A to select them all. Now click on any thumbnail and drag the whole bunch of photos (even if there’s a thousand — it moves as easily if there were two) and drag them into the trash. Don’t freak out — remember you have a full backup on your memory card, but you won’t have to use it anyway. So, just drag them all into the trash can on your desktop. The warning dialog above will appear letting you know some of the images are locked, and it’s asking if we want to move those locked files into the trash, too? Our answer is “NO!” but there is no “NO” so first turn on the “Apply to All” checkbox then click the Skip button as shown above. That way, only the unlocked photos goes into the trash can (the Apply to All checkbox keeps you from clicking the “Skip” button for every locked photo in your folder).

peteplay3

STEP THREE: (above)
Now when you look back in your folder, all that is left is your locked files (the ones you hit the lock button on during the game).

peteplay3a

STEP FOUR:
Select all the images left in that folder and drag those straight onto the Lightroom Dock Icon and it brings up the import window for just those images. Now you can work on just your tagged keepers, just like in Photo Mechanic — But you’re not done yet. There’s one important final step that brings this full circle.

peteplay4

 

STEP FIVE (above)
Go back to the Finder and before you do anything else, just press the keyboard shortcut “Command-Z” (for “undo”) and all those images you put in the trash jump right back into that original folder again. That’s it!

Now, how long does this process take once you’ve copied the images onto your computer? Well, I thought you might ask that, so I timed it using the stopwatch on my phone. It took 21-seconds.

This is one you have to try once — it actually works better than it sounds. Thanks to Pete Collins for helping me figure this one out, and again, if you’ve got a similar workaround for Windows without using an add-on to Lightroom, we’d love to hear it.

Hope you sports photographers found that helpful, and here’s wishing you lots of great shots this weekend (I’ll be shooting the Steelers/Falcons game in Atlanta on Sunday up in the Georgia Dome). :)

Best,

-Scott

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Scott Kelby http://scottkelby.com <![CDATA[Lightroom Retouching Tip: Fixing Hotspots]]> http://lightroomkillertips.com/?p=6406 2014-12-11T15:00:08Z 2014-12-11T08:01:30Z This is a quick tip with great results when you’r […]

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This is a quick tip with great results when you’re trying to remove shiny areas on your subject’s face.  Of course you could just use the Spot Removal tool with a big enough brush and just “heal” the hot spot away, but the problem is — it also removes the highlight as well. We generally want to keep the highlight, but lose the shine. Here’s how:

hotspot1

Above: Here’s our original image — note the shiny hot spots in her cheeks and forehead. Ack!

hotspot2

Above: When we remove the Hot Spot (using the Spot Removal Tool with a really big brush size in this case), it not only removes the hot spot, but unfortunately, we lose the highlights as well (and we want to keep the highlights – just lose the shine). Plus, the fix overall just doesn’t look very realistic (even after I manually moved the source circle to a better location. Probably should have used yesterday’s keyboards shortcut tip, eh?). ;-)

hotspot3a

Above: The trick to keeping the highlights but losing the shine is this: after you totally remove the Hot Spot, go to the Spot Tool’s options panel and lower the Opacity amount (circled in red above) enough so you clearly see the highlight but you don’t have the shiny look (as seen here where I lowered the Opacity slider down to 33%). This not only gets rid of the shine and keeps the highlight, the entire retouch looks much better. Pretty quick and easy. :)

By the way, I use this same technique when I have a subject who has a prominent mole or scar and I know if I remove it completely, their friends and family will know it’s been retouched, so I use the Spot Removal Tool to remove it completely, then I lower the Opacity amount, just like I did here, to bring back some of the mole or scar, so you can still see it’s there but it’s not so “in your face” (so to speak).

There ya have it — hope you find it helpful. :)

Best,

-Scott

 

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